Wooden Cornice Board and Reuben’s Room Reveal

I know you have all been on pins and needles, racked with anxiety wondering how we made our wooden cornice board in Reuben’s room. Your wait is over at long last!

I found this idea on, what else, Pinterest. There were a couple of different ideas like this and this and this. Our final product was most similar to the last one at IHeartNaptime.net. There were a few issues that kept me from duplicating it completely: I wanted the valance to extend beyond the window frame and I wanted a curtain rod built into the cornice board. Building the cornice board out of solid wood (or MDF in our case) means it is very heavy and needs to be secured directly into the studs. If I secured the sides of the valance with L brackets, like they do here, I would be forced to either make the box just as wide as the window frame or extend it like 16 inches in both directions to find the next studs. One is too small, the other is too long. What’s a Goldie DIY’er to do?

Using L Brackes to secure the sides (click picture for source link)
Cornice board secured to studs framing the window (click picture for source link)

Dad to the rescue!! The cornice board itself is made in a similar fashion as the one from Pinterest. We made ours a little deeper to accommodate a curtain rod.

Three sided MDF box topped with crown molding, shoe molding on bottom
Our Cornice Board: three sided MDF box topped with crown molding, shoe molding on bottom

I’m going to do my best to explain how he fixed the length issue. It is brilliant and so simple. Instead of securing the cornice board by the sides, my dad fashioned a block cut at a 45 degree (or close enough) angle that ran along the back of the cornice board and fits snuggly on a inverse block attached to the header board stud. Pictures to explain:

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Back side of cornice board, block running entire length
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Block attached inside cornice board
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Block cut with inverse angle attached to header board above window
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Close up to show block secured to wall cut at angle. Block on cornice board will slide and fit into this.

This fixed the stud problem. The block on the wall is secured to the header stud in the window frame. The weight of the cornice board will be evenly and securely distributed along this block.

The original plan was to make cut-outs on the inside of the sides of the cornice board for a dowel rod to slide in. But we got ahead of ourselves and, well, forgot. So instead we used a closet rod kit. You know the ones, they have two brackets you mount to the wall for a rod to go in. We  used a dowel rod, about one and a half inches in diameter and cut to length. Note: it’s a good idea to go over the dowel rod with sandpaper beforehand just to help the curtain slide on easier. We were hanging blackout curtains that are going to stay closed, so we don’t really need to be able to open and close the curtains regularly. If we were, I would have used a smaller diameter rod (this just fits in the curtain pocket) and painted or stained the rod to make it extra smooth.

Closet rod bracket on inside of cornice board
Closet rod bracket on inside of cornice board

After everything was primed and painted, we hung the curtains and put ‘er up on the wall. It looks so beautiful! All things considered, this was made for cheaper than most curtain rods, and certain much much cheaper than store bought wooden valances. I love how it turned out and want to make two more to go in our dining room if ever we get around to that room! But that’s another day.

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Finished Product!
Finished Product!
What we started with
What we started with
starting right of the door
starting right of the door
moving left
moving left
moving left (pretend the pack n play is clean)
moving left (pretend the pack n play is clean)
moving left (obviously this side of the room still needs some lovin')
moving left (obviously this side of the room still needs some lovin’)

His poor walls are so bare, but he’ll be in there a while so I’m sure we’ll come across somethings to hang up. I still need to get a blasted rug for in there but I am forever forgetting. The corner with the bookcases still needs some organizing attention, but it’s functional now so I suspect it’ll just stay that way awhile 😉

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4 thoughts on “Wooden Cornice Board and Reuben’s Room Reveal

  1. Pingback: Make Way for Baby: Phase One | Being the Carruths

  2. Pingback: The stuff that Daddy built | Being the Carruths

  3. Pingback: Make Way for Baby: Phase One Continued | Being the Carruths

  4. Pingback: Our New Nook | Being the Carruths

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