Quarterly Reading Report June 2017 Edition

This year’s motivation has become about goals: short, annual and life-long. Maybe being out of control of fixing our house has made me over-eager to feel a sense of accomplishment. Maybe I just like lists. Either way, goals are being set and met!

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I’ve been ticking away at the Better World Books reading challenge.  Since March, I’ve crossed off these 6 categories:

I have 6 out of 25 left: Based on a Fairy Tale, National Book Award Winner, Travel Romance, Banned Book, Book of Poetry, About Immigrants and Translated. I am currently knee deep in The Brother’s Karamazov (more on that later!) which is, obviously, a translation. I have C.S. Lewis’s Narrative Poems and The World According to Garp by John Irving which will fulfill poetry and National Book Award respectively.  I have nothing in mind for the others. Any suggestions?

As for life-long goals I have new and old ones. I am currently 350 pages away from meeting a long-standing reading goal: read and understand a famous Russian novel. I have been chipping away at The Brother’s Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoyevsky since the middle of May. I’m trying to strike a balance between taking my time and not losing momentum. The book is broken into 7 parts, each roughly 100 pages. Between each part I allow myself a “treat” book. Nothing too long, I don’t want to break my interest, but I also want to give my brain a little break. This tome takes more energy and concentration that most books I’ve read recently. So far this system is working; I’m halfway through the third part and I am still interested and understanding!! Midsummer’s Night Dream was my last brain-break book and now I’m committed to another 130 Russian pages before my next break.

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I dreamed up a new life-long reading goal this year : read a book set in each country in the world. I am focusing on Europe this year and so far I’ve crossed off France, Greece, Montenegro, Spain, England and Scotland. I have also added Pakistan and China. I would really love to read a book *from* each country but I vacillate between what’s ideal and what’s practical. Certainly, I stand to learn a great deal more reading a book from each country but I’m limited by only knowing English. This presents some translation concerns. Not to mention, there are a whole lot of countries, even just in Europe, that I’ve never heard of much less have a working knowledge of their notable literature. Which is more probable: finding books *set* in Slovakia or finding books *from* Slovakia translated into English? Which goal would you set?

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In addition to reading the six books listed above this past quarter, I went on a Hemingway rant and read A Moveable Feast and The Sun Also Rises. Added to For Whom the Bell Tolls which I read earlier this year, these books have given me a favorable impression of Hemingway and now I want to jump over to F. Scott Fitzgerald. I’ve read The Great Gatsby but I wonder if I’d enjoy a biography better. Who is a Fitzgerald fan? What would you recommend?

It is rare these days (read: when J.K. Rowling doesn’t publish anything) that I read a book the year it comes out. When I noticed Paula Hawkins, of Girl on the Train, fame published a new book, however, I put a hold for it at the library (sorry Paula) and practically inhaled it. I enjoyed Girl on the Train a great deal. While this second book, Into the Water, may not be quite as profound as it’s predecessor, it is a great read. I was a little disappointed with the ultimate reveal, but the story itself was certainly compelling and exciting.

Do you have any auspicious summer reading goals, or are you looking for anything that can be read on a beach? Do you like to keep reading lists or set new goals or do you like to go wherever your whim may take you? Hopefully I’ll have more to update on after the summer than just Karamazov. Even if that’s all I accomplish,though, I’ll be proud of it!

 

 

 

Quarterly Book Report April 2017 Edition

This is my second post for National Library Week! What is the primary purpose of a library? Is it a capitalist institution satiating the desires of the majority? Is it a social program giving needed information and internet access to the underprivileged? Is it a museum to knowledge for knowledge’s sake?

Well that’s a bit in dispute. As it happens, I am writing this blog at the library because we don’t have internet at our trailer but what we use the library primarily for is … reading! I know, we’re trailblazers. I like each year to track and challenge my reading goals and then write blog posts about it. Thank you for being a part of this.

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As it would happen, we are one quarter the way through the year and I am one quarter through my reading challenge. I think they call that being on track 😉 I have set out this year to read 42 books and complete a 25-point reading challenge.

The tally as of March 31 is 13 books!

  1. Saint Odd (series finale!)
  2. Around the World in Seventy-Two Days and Other Writings by Nellie Bly
  3. The Black Mountain (Nero Wolfe #24)*
  4. Breakfast at Tiffany’s (and other stories)
  5. I Am Malala*
  6. For Whom the Bells Toll
  7. Neverwhere*
  8. Their Eyes Were Watching God
  9. The King’s Speech*
  10. American Gods*
  11. The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy*
  12. The Monarch of the Glen
  13. The King in Yellow*

*Audiobooks – while I am proud of my list thus far, I don’t want to mislead you, reader, in thinking I have all this time to sit down and read-read.

As for the Better World Book Reading Challenge, I’ve fulfilled the following:

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  • Fantasy Novel (Odd Thomas)
  • Short Stories (Breakfast at Tiffany’s)
  • Color in Title (Black Mountain)
  • 100+ Years Old (Around the World in 72 Days)
  • Set in a Place You Want to Visit (Monarch of the Glen ((Scotland)))
  • Over 400 Pages (For Whom the Bell Tolls)
  • Colored Author (Their Eyes Were Watching God)
  • Female Author (I Am Malala)
  • About A Historical Event (The King’s Speech)
  • Adapted Into A Movie (Hitchhiker’s Guide)

 

Nellie Bly is kick ass and there’s just no other way to give her justice. I’ve written on her before and I won’t belabor the point. Her newspaper career began after she submitted a response to a gentleman’s bitter letter-to-the-Editor of what is to be done with daughters who will not marry. Bly’s response, support a society in which it is safe for women to work and make a living wage, ruffled a few 1880’s New England feathers. The newspaper hired her on the spot.  Of her works, I enjoyed the undercover jaunts, Ten Days in a Madhouse and The Girls Who Make Boxes, best. In both stories, she brings to light the real conditions in which turn of the century women were living and exposes injustice therein.

Speaking of turn of the century, The King in Yellow was a surprise! I downloaded the audiobook one evening having forgotten what it was about or why I was interested in it. Written by Robert Chambers, The King in Yellow is a collection of short stories all centering around a fictitious devil-book of the same name. These memorable stories are in the delightful spooky gothic style of Shirley Jackson and make me smile even now to think of.

And speaking of ruffling feathers, Truman Capote.  As a persona, he puts a bad taste in my mouth but I freely admit Capote is a fantastic writer. I enjoyed each of the stories in Breakfast at Tiffany’s, the title story being my favorite. I like Audrey Hepburn as much as the next person, provided the next person thinks she’s all right but no Julie Andrews. I have never liked the movie Breakfast at Tiffany’s however (sorry Selene). I found it dark and long and confusing. I just remember the cat and the rain and not knowing what was going on. Isn’t that the one where she does that weird snapping dance thing in a club? I digress. The short-story, by comparison, is richer than I remember the movie. Holly Golightly, in text, is vibrant, exciting and a little frightening. In just 100 short pages you come to love, hate and love-to-hate her in the most delightful way.

I did not enjoy all my early year reads however. The King’s Speech by Mark Logue was a huge disappointment. I didn’t realize until starting it that this book was written after the movie was made. Apparently, the makers of the movie sparked Logue’s interest in his own family and he wrote this johnny-come-lately book from stuff that didn’t make it into the movie. It’s like the most boring “special features” on a DVD.

I am Malala as a book was a bit dull. Her story and life are fascinating and I’m glad to have read it; it broadened my world-view. However, the book itself reads a bit like a report for school. While learning Pakistan’s history helped explain the state of the country the day Malala was shot, it got hard to read after a while. I do not mean for my critique to detract from her story or her history, both are rich and important for modern Westerners to understand. I recommend it highly, just with that small caveat.

As always with these reading reports, I must stop before I ramble too long. If you want my opinion on the others, don’t hesitate to ask and I won’t hesitate to answer profusely.

I’ve enjoyed most of the books I’ve read so far and I’ve got another stack ready to go. Let’s see if I remember to update again in June!

Remember the best place to try a new book is at the Library! You aren’t out any money on duds and any gems you find are easy to share! What have you checked out lately?

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2017 Reading Goals

If last year is any indication, I will be reading a lot in 2017. Last year I found a lot of delightful distraction in reading. I haven’t done very stringent goals in number of years, so I decided this is the year!

Official 2017 Reading Goals:

  • 42 Books
  • 12,000 Pages
  • Complete BWB Reading Challenge
  • Read books set in European countries

The last time I did a reading challenge, it was just too long and pretty obscure. This year BetterWorldBooks is hosting a reading challenge and their list is much shorter and more doable. That’s my kind of challenge.

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In addition to this year long challenge, I’ve started a life-time goal to read a book from each country in the world. I’m starting with the European countries.

As it happens I’ve already finished a few which apply to these challenges — Breakfast at Tiffany’s by Truman Capote (Book of Short Stories), I Am Malala by Malala Yousafzai( a book written by a female ), Around the World in 72 Days by Nellie Bly ( book that’s over 100 years old ) and Saint Odd by Dean Koontz ( a fantasy novel ).

2017 is off to a fun start. I like the diversity I’ve gotten so far. Next up is more Neil Gaiman and For Whom the Bell Tolls.

For those who are interested, BetterWorldBooks has a Goodread’s group set up to help give reading ideas to fulfill the challenge. And of course, if you don’t want to join the group, but have suggestions that would fit in some of the categories, don’t keep them to yourself 😉 I have no idea what to read based on a fairy tale or set in a forest. Robin Hood?

Anyone else setting reading goals? Do you use GoodRead’s to track what you’re reading?