Book Tag

Have you heard about this? I just stumbled across it. For someone who wants to be a blogger, I’m pretty out of the loop. Anyway, a book tag is a list of questions and prompts about books you’ve read. There are some that are more themed but I found this one that’s just straight forward fiction. It looks like fun and who knows, maybe some of you will want to read it!


Author you’ve read the most books from:

cc6ef39d0da1aa5f938d388f547bfc5aHands down Rex Stout. I’ve read nearly every Nero Wolfe mystery. There are a few left on the list and a few that are really hard to come by, but it’s got to be around 60 stories: short, novella and novel.

Next would be J.K. Rowling. I’ve read all the Harry Potters and all the Cormoran Strikes, so 10 books total. I read 50 pages of Casual Vacancy and put it down. But I think I should still get credit for those pages.

Best Sequel Ever:

Two Towers by J.R.R. Tolkien I guess. I liked it better than The Fellowship of the Ring. The Tolkien enthusiast might say it’s not really a sequel, but I’m not an enthusiast and to be honest, I haven’t read that many other series.

Currently Reading:

Funny you should ask, The Return of the King by J.R.R. Tolkien.

Drink of Choice While Reading:

Water. Disappointing, I know

E-reader or Physical Book?

Physical book. I need the sense of accomplishment that comes when there are more pages on the left side than the right.

Fictional Character You Probably Would Have Actually Dated In High School:

anton-yelchin-odd-thomas67-e1374441431596I’d like to think sweet, sensitive Daniel Sempere from The Shadow of the Wind (provided he could speak English) but more likely it’d be virginal Odd Thomas (series by Dean Koontz)

Glad You Gave This Book A Chance:

A Canticle for Liebowitz by Walter M. Miller Jr. To date my favorite sci-fi, post-apocalyptic story.

Hidden Gem Book:

The Good Thief’s Guide series by Chris Ewan. I picked it up on a whim from the library literally based on it’s cover and now they’re among my favorite books.

Important Moment in your Reading Life:

When I stayed up all night to read A Matter of Honor by Jeffery Archer, when Evangeline by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow made me cry and when The Birds by Daphne Du Maurier scared the shit out of me.

Just Finished:

North to the Orient by Anne Morrow Lindbergh. Such a beautiful travel journal.

Kinds of Books You Won’t Read:

Slasher Thrillers. I like suspense and thrillers, but if it’s gory or over the top sensationalized, I won’t touch it.

Longest Book You’ve Read:

gone_with_the_wind_coverGone With The Wind by Margaret Mitchell. The edition I have is 959 pages.  Again, the Tolkien enthusiast will say The Lord of the Rings books are really one book broken into three parts and in that case, when I finish The Return of the King, I’ll have read a 1,008 page “book.”

Major book hangover because of:

Everything is Illuminated by Jonathon Safran Foer. This applies to book and movie really. It took a few days to just take it all in.

Number of Bookcases You Own:

Five and a half. Three in the master bedroom,  half a shelf in Ryan’s closet, one in the girls’ room and one in the living room. I want more in the living room.

One Book You Have Read Multiple Times:

Rebecca by Daphne Du Maurier. I’ve read it about 5 times, I think. Once every other year since senior year in high school

Preferred Place To Read:

Somewhere cold with lots of cushions and blankets.

Quote that inspires you/gives you all the feels from a book you’ve read:

From the poem Evangeline by Longfellow:

“Whispered  a gentle voice, in accents tender and saint-like,

‘Gabriel! O my beloved!” and died away into silence”

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Reading Regret:

I regret not getting on the Harry Potter band-wagon when the books were being published. I read all the books before the final movie came out but I missed out on the experience of waiting with half the world for the next book.

Series You Started And Need To Finish(all books are out in series):

Odd Thomas by Dean Koontz. I’ve read the first four and really like them. From what I understand the series is headed toward a great conclusion.

Three of your All-Time Favorite Books:

Rebecca by Daphne Du Maurier

The Deathly Hallows by J.K. Rowling

The History of the Breast by Marilyn Yalom

Unapologetic Fangirl For:

f0efe-strikeCormoran Strike \ Robert Galbraith

Very Excited For This Release More Than All The Others:

The next Cormoran Strike!! Whenever that’ll be.

Worst Bookish Habit:

Checking out alllllllll the books by an author or pertaining to a subject from the library at the same time. I read one, the first chapter of another and return the whole lot.

X Marks The Spot: Start at the top left of your shelf and pick the 27th book:

Cranford by Elizabeth Gaskell. This is one of the few fiction books we own that I haven’t read. I fully intend to, I just need a proper psyching-up to read Victorian England books.

Your latest book purchase:

Democracy Now! Twenty Years Covering the Movements Changing America by Amy Goodman. I’ve read the first chapter and I find it all very interesting. The problem I’m having with it is that it reads like a news report which can be dull after 5 or so pages.

ZZZ-snatcher book (last book that kept you up WAY late):

The Shadow of the Wind by Carlos Ruiz Zafon


What about you? Could you answer each of these questions?

2015 Reading Goal — Complete

I know you have all been on pins and needles waiting nine months for me to write another post! Fear not, I have returned, if only to expand what was going to be a long facebook status. Tomorrow is New Year’s Eve and while I am in the middle of a book, I don’t think there are enough hours left in 2015 for me to finish it. Therefore, I’m going to call it and give the results of my reading goals.

The only real goal I set for myself was to read 35 books this year. According to Goodreads, I’ve read 45 books, a total of 14,942 pages! Before you get all impressed with me though, a good number of those were audiobooks. Insomnia is the real winner here.

Beyond that, I wanted to just follow my interests and see, without forcing it, how many books I could check off a reading challenge I found online. I’m pretty proud to say, out of 50 categories, I read all but 8! I didn’t find a book by an author with my initials, set during Christmas or the future. I didn’t read a (full) trilogy, a book written the year I was born, a book my mom loves or a book with a one word title. But still, go me, right?

One of my continuing interests has been The Middle Ages. I’m still pretty new to this era; I’m working on just placing it in my mind. Eleanor of Aquitaine and the founding of universities are probably the most interesting facets to me. This year, I read these Middle Age themed books:

Middle Ages

Fiction

  1. The Name of the Rose by Umberto Eco — I greatly enjoyed this book and I’m anxiously awaiting Ryan finishing it (he calls it a Middle Ages Sherlock Holmes book) so we can watch the Sean Connery movie. This was the first time Eco has come across my radar. I’ve added more of his books to my eternal to-read list.
  2. The Pillars of the Earth by Ken Follett — I wasn’t super crazy about it. I liked the Abbot character and I liked getting a setting of the Middle Ages in my head. But as for the story and the majority of characters? Meh.
  3. Murder in the Cathedral by T.S. Eliot — Ryan is a devout Eliot fan. When I said I wanted to read this play, he excitedly offered to read it aloud to me. Both the play and the experience were delightful.

Non-Fiction

  1. A Concise History of the Crusades by Thomas F. Madden — Yes, so this is a short textbook. It is dense and it moves fast. I took notes, but ultimately decided just to read it and get what I could out of it. It was easy to follow and I’m glad to have read it. I feel like I have a firmer grasp on what the Crusades were and the men who lead them.
  2. Four Queens: Four Provencal Sisters Who Ruled Europe by Nancy Goldstone — If you’ve been paying close attention, it should come as no surprise that I like this book by Nancy Goldstone. It is not a historical fiction, but it almost reads like it. She does a great job shaping each “character” so that you feel you know them and understand their motives throughout their history.

 

To balance out the seriousness of history, I also read a number of “fun books.” These are books which are quick, easy reads without many deep emotions. This is now my new favorite shelf on my goodreads.

Fun Reads

  1. The Big Year: A Tale of a Man, Nature and Fowl Obsession by Mark Obmascik — Who would have thought the world of competitive bird watching could be so darn interesting?? But it is and it is funny.
  2. As You Wish: Inconceivable Tales from the Making of The Princess Bride by Cary Elwes — As fun and entertaining as you’d expect. It helps if you’re a fan of the movie, but you don’t have to be. This isn’t a tell-all book, just fun tales from behind the scenes with a lot of name dropping.
  3. The Good Thief’s Guide to Amsterdam (and Paris, and Las Vegas, and Berlin and Venice) by Chris Ewan — If I’ve talked to you in person this year, I’ve probably told you to read these books. They aren’t crass, but they aren’t simple either. Just fun heist stories with likable characters.
  4. Mr. Penumbra’s 24 Hour Bookstore by Robin Sloan — Y’all. The book jacket glows in the dark! The story is a bit far-fetched, but if you just relax a but and go for it, it’s a fun ride.
  5. The Sweetness at the Bottom of the Pie by Alan Bradley — I liked this twist on the typical British comfy mystery, but I don’t suspect I’ll read any more in the series. Something about the 11 year old main character just didn’t work well in my mind.

As always, I have a list of “I really should read that” books. Classics for various reasons, these are those books that you get points for knowing about, but if you really want to consider yourself well read, you have to actually read them. I didn’t make great strides in this area this year, but I got a few more under my belt.

Have to Read

  1. The Moonstone by Wilkie Collins — I enjoyed this more than I did The Lady in White. It had more plot. But I think Collins will remain in my mind just one of those people you have to read, but not necessarily a favorite. To be fair, I’m not always crazy about the lackadaisical late 19th century writers.
  2. The Bean Trees and Pigs in Heaven by Barbara Kingsolver — Kingsolver is one of my favorite story tellers. While I liked The Bean Trees, I didn’t enjoy the sequel as much. I don’t often read books set in the west or involving Native American culture so these were new and refreshing to me.
  3. Tales of H.P. Lovecraft — Cthulhu! I get it now! I’ve stuck a toe out into Science Fiction a few times and each time I come away with the reassurance that it’s not really for me. Lovecraft’s ghost stories, however, sent shivers down my spine just the way I like it.
  4. The Two Towers by J.R.R. Tolken — I’m getting closer to Mordor! This was a much more enjoyable read than The Fellowship of the Ring. More action, character development, etc. You get to see a lot more of Middle Earth — it just feels less like a history lesson. And can I just say, when the Orcs are attacking and they get pushed back and turn to retreat only to find themselves facing a forest of Ents that weren’t there before?! Favorite scene yet. I am excited to finish the series soon.
  5. Sense and Sensibility  by Jane Austin. Can’t say I liked it more than Pride and Prejudice, but it was enjoyable. I’m up to 4 out of 7 Austin novels!

 

25735012By and far my favorite book I read this year is the latest Cormoran Strike novel, Career of Evil by Robert Galbraith (pen name for J.K. Rowling). This is the third book and I’ve savored them all. I was a little disappointed in the last book, The Silkworm. It felt rushed and exaggerated to me and I sincerely hoped there would be less shock-value tricks in this one. It was a bit gruesome, but not out of place, if that makes any sense at all. Reading this book, I felt as though Rowling was experimenting and playing with new ideas, and that made it very fun to read. In interviews, she has said she began the Strike series to try her hand at the detective genre. It would seem, assured by her success, Rowling is now flexing her literary muscles. Much to the enjoyment of all, of course.

2015 Books4

There are a few books which I feel will stick with me for quite a while. This year I read Persepolis by Marjane Satrapi for the first time. It was also my first full length graphic novel experience. As cheesy as it may sound, it’s helped me be more sympathetic and open-minded towards issues in the middle east and especially those seeking asylum. It has helped me humanize images I see or statistics in the news.

In a similar vein, reading Deep Dark Down: The Untold Stories of 33 Men Buried in a Chilean Mine, and the Miracle That Set Them Free by Hector Tobar saddened me, not only for what these men and their families went through, but for the general amnesia I have when it comes to world events. Even local and national events are likely to slip my mind once out of sight. The fact that I was only half aware when this was happening and that I forgot as soon as they were out makes me want to be a better person.

I plan again to set a reading challenge for 2016. I liked the pace and freedom of this past year. I feel like I read a greater variety than I have in the past few years. I’m halfway through another non-fiction about the Middle Ages and I’m excited to continue satisfying that curiosity. I hope to finish The Lord of the Rings in this next year. Overall though, I hope in this next year to broaden my horizons a bit more and expand my knowledge all the more.

Happy New Year!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Writing the Opposite Sex

As soon as I possibly could, I read The Silkworm by Robert Galbraith (aka J.K. Rowling). It came as no surprise that I loved it! What I enjoyed the most was the character development of both Robin and Cormoran. This was partly because it makes me happy to see Rowling setting up for a continuing series (keep ’em coming, J.K.!!). But also, Rowling has such a knack for writing complex, diverse and completely realistic characters; it is fun to watch them develop. After finishing The Silkworm, I spent a few days just absorbing the novel and allowing my mind to wander.

I noted how aptly J.K. Rowling can write characters of the opposite sex (hello entire male cast of the Harry Potter series). She’s able to write characters who think, process, speak and act in completely believable male ways. At the same time, her male characters are not stale or sterotypes. They are complex, well-rounded characters who develop through the story and display various virtues without being feminized. Each one unique to himself and not a copy of characters who’ve come before (save maybe Fred and George;) )

Of course this train of thought went off in many directions: are female authors as a group more capable of writing characters of the opposite sex? Is there some empathy more readily available to women to write a male character with depth? Are there as many equally complex and dynamic female characters written by male authors?

I can’t tell you how much fun I’ve had thinking about this lately. I have had a continuing conversation comparing characters written by authors of the opposite sex. There are some obvious short comings to these comparisons: lead or iconic characters are less often female and as a whole in the western literary world, more authors are male. So by sheer numbers, it isn’t an apples to apples comparison. But I’ve compiled a list of what I think are the best characters written by authors of the opposite sex.

My criteria were: enduring characters who’s stories retain some level of popularity today, characters who are believable and realistic in their gender (thus showing apt skill of the author to write more than a simple characture), characters who have some real depth or complexity to them, not merely cardboard cut-outs.  I also eliminated characters based on real people or folklore since they lack complete originality from the author. So here goes the fun!

Most Notable Male Characters Written by Female Authors:

  • Atticus Finch from Harper Lee’s To Kill a Mockingbird — Few male American characters have the strength of character and virtue prized in Atticus Finch. He is an enduring and beloved character both for his perseverance of conviction and his unconventional role as a father. He walks in both compassion and strength, an educated man who is a friend and advocate of the everyman. Atticus Finch is a man we would all be proud to know.
  • Rhett Butler from Margaret Mitchell’s Gone With The Wind — In direct contrast to Finch’s still-water, easy-going character is Rhett Butler. Just as enduring of a character, Rhett is pretty much everything Finch is not. He is a fun-loving, self-serving, woman-wooing son-of-a-bitch who we all love. Margaret Mitchell reveals the true depth of Rhett Butler, however, many times. Yes he is a war profiteer, but his convictions also lead him to serve in the army. Sure he just wants to save himself, but Scarlett would never have made it out of Atlanta without his help. Bonnie. I’ll just leave that there. As we see Scarlett hardening through the war, Rhett softens. From the beginning, he sees through Scarlett’s facade and shrewdly knows her for who she really is. He opens himself for love and accepts responsibility all while retaining his virile rugged masculinity.
  • Albus Dumbledore from J.K. Rowling’s Harry Potter series– Really I could have chosen nearly any male character from the series (Harry, Hagrid, Lupin, Lucious) but I’ve already gushed about how great of a writer Rowling is. When it comes to Dumbledore, what isn’t there to love? He is a brilliant mix of genteel strength, power and humanity. He is a man who craves power and prides himself on his intelligence. Yet there is a self-deprecating humility about him and a level of penitential self-control which keeps him on a narrower path than the likes of Voldemort and Grindlewald.  At the close of the series, Dumbledore’s many faults are revealed. These faults serve to humanize the great wizard and embolden the hero, Harry to ultimate victory. While I wouldn’t characterize Dumbledore as a father figure to Harry, I think it is safe to say without a doubt that their dynamic would be entirely different had Dumbledore been written as a female character.
  • Severus Snape from J.K. Rowling’s Harry Potter series — I tried to limit myself to one Rowling character, but I think it would be a discredit to this list to leave off Severus Snape. Just thinking about the final revelations of Snape’s characters choke me up. Throughout the majority of the series, Professor Snape is simply a brooding bitter man with questionable allegiance. He hates Harry because he hated his father, he’s disgruntled in his job and he wears all black. Until, oh until, we find the true strength and loyalty of his character. Despite all the years, all the danger and all the heartache, Snape remains true to the memory of the only woman he ever loved. He protects her son at all costs and ultimately puts himself in such danger as to lose his life in order that Harry may proceed to victory.
  • Maxim DeWinter from Daphne DuMaurier’s Rebecca — I considered also Richard Grenvile from the same author’s The King’s General, but I don’t find him to be as enduring in the pop culture sense. Maxim is, to me, the epitome of  a haunted man. His brooding and sudden shifts of mood are terrifying while his passion and affection for his second wife melt your heart. DuMaurier perfectly writes the masculine version of a character haunted by guilt and ghosts. He turns inward, scared and ashamed of his secret until he snaps and lashes out violently. Only then to return to the Maxim his wife loves.

Men Written by Women

  • Honorable Mention:
    • Fitzwilliam Darcy from Jane Austin’s Pride and Prejudice
    • Dr. Frankenstein from Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein
    • Ashley Wilkes from Margaret Mitchell’s Gone With The Wind

Most Notable Female Characters Written by Male Authors:

  • Lady Macbeth from William Shakespeare’s Macbeth — Is there a female character with more depth or more complexity than Lady Macbeth? I think not. Themes of power, desire and ambition are common in Shakespeare’s plays, and in Lady Macbeth they are absolutely explosive. She laments and curses her womanhood, which keeps her from killing Duncan herself and achieving her ambition. Despite her woman’s breasts however, Lady Macbeth’s blood is thickened and her passage to regret is indeed stopped up. She is haunted by guilt and ghosts much like Maxim DeWinter, however, her’s is an entirely different path altogether. Never is there a story of more woe than this, of corruption and destruction upon Lady Macbeth’s soul.
  • Ophelia from William Shakespeare’s Hamlet —  You don’t get to be “The Bard” for nothing. Shakespeare’s dramas seem to be an exercise in “how many ways can a person be driven to madness?” While Lady M is the cause of her own crazy, Ophelia is driven mad by her lack of power and control. It is the sudden withdraw of those powerful men who kept her safe that lead her to her own end. Lady M is driven mad by her strength while Ophelia is undone by her weakness.
  • Blanche DuBois from Tennessee William’s A Streetcar Names Desire — Speaking of crazy. It would seem male authors are most apt at creating women whoare driven to insanity. Like Ophelia, Blanche is a woman who’s support is pulled out from under her. During her visit to her sister, she reveals the truth to her situation. She slowly looses her grip on reality while still trying to maintain the standards of her social status.
  • Irene Adler from Sir Arthur Conan Doyle’s A Scandal in Bohemia — Not a crazy person. Or at least not in the same sense of the others on this list. Here is a woman bedecked with the highest praise and honor Sherlock Holmes can possibly allow. “The Woman”. Surely hundreds of pages can be written on Doyle’s choice of title. Irene Adler is not merely a female version of Sherlock Holmes. Rather she is a woman who is able to gracefully move through society while also possessing wit and intelligence to match Holmes. She carries herself with pride and gentility and is not easily undone or intimidated.
  • Hester Prynne from Nathanel Hawthorne’s The Scarlet Letter The Scarlet Letter is an enduring story for many reasons, one of which is the unique take on shamed women. Hawthorne does not merely recreate a character of low morals who is caught in her debauchery and serves as a warning to others. When Hester becomes pregnant out of wedlock, she is immediately shamed by the community with a scarlet letter sewn to her dress. But through the story she bears her burden faithfully never seeking retribution or apology. She retains the love she has for the father of her child, without naming him and destroying his character along with hers. In this act she illuminates the inequality shown to men verses women who commit the same sin. She is a woman of strength, integrity and silent grace.

Women Written by Men

  • Honorable Mention:
    • Lisbeth Salander from Steig Larsson’s Millennium series
    • The Wife of Bath from Geoffery Chaucer’s The Canterbury Tales

I am perfectly willing to admit my lists may be flawed, especially the latter. During this exercise I realized I have not read many of the classic books with female characters written by male authors, namely: Anna Karenina, Lolita, Les Miserables or Sophie’s Choice. Also eliminating folk tale type characters did limit the second list greatly. There have been some male authors and poets who have beautifully breathed life into many females of the past. So there may be some big holes in the lists. But it was a fun thought experiment none the less.

Who makes your list? Which characters do you love who were penned by an author of the opposite sex? Do you think the sex of an author effects how well they are able to create characters of the opposite sex?

How The Reading Goes

Yeah, it’s been a while since I’ve updated the old blog. I’m just going to plea newborn status and move on.

2014-08-04 13.10.28

 

So, we’re over halfway through the year and I figured it’s time for a little reading challenge update. Since I last updated in April, my book count has taken off. As of today, I’ve read 23 of 35 books and 6,692 pages out of 11,000.

Audiobooks have helped those counts a great deal while not adding much great substance. I have no shame though in admitting that I greatly enjoyed listening to back to back Nero Wolfe novels.

Speaking of goals, however, I have done very little to further my Southern works repertoire. Thanks to the magic of audiobooks, I’ve listened to A Good Man is Hard to Find by Flannery O’Conner and The Moviegoer by Walker Percy. I can’t recall much emotion following the completion of either of those books, but I’m at least glad to have them crossed off my list. Since reading those in early April, however, I’ve read nothing else Southern related. We’ll see if that bug comes back around to motivate me before the end of the year.

I have read some books that I’ve enjoyed including; The Hangman’s Daughter by Oliver Potzsch, The Prisoner of Heaven by Carlos Ruiz Zafon, The Salinger Contract by Adam Langer The Mysteries of the Middle Ages by Thomas Cahill and The Silkworm!!

I didn’t get into the Harry Potter fandom until after the books were all published, so I missed out on the anticipation and worldwide excitement for each release. Although Cormoran Strike pales in comparison to Harry Potter in the global scene, it’s been fun to be a part of the excitement. The second installment was a little grittier than The Cuckoo’s Calling, however it was a great read. Galbraith\Rowling included a considerable amount of character development in The Silkworm which makes me even more excited for this series to continue.

I am proud to announce I finished a non-fiction, non-audiobook! My brain has been moving so slow lately, it’s taken a lot of motivation to pick up a book. But Thomas Cahill did it again; he enraptured my attention in the 5th book of his Hinges of History series, The Mysteries of the Middle Ages. I read the first installment, How the Irish Saved Civilization, then skipped books 2-4 and picked up in the middle ages. Ryan enjoyed my reading this book, as I think it is one of his life goals to prove to the world that the 11th-13th centuries weren’t stagnant, oppressive bleak eras when people sat around waiting for the Enlightenment. For me, it was very enthralling and all mostly new. I feel I have a much better framework for how the lives of St. Francis, Thomas Aquinas and Dante fit into history, as well as new-to-me important figures such as Eleanor of Aquitaine and Giotto. I look forward to reading the next installment covering the Renaissance.

I haven’t set out to read book series, but I find myself in the middle of a few. In addition to Cormoran Strike and The Hinges of History, I’ve  also been following  The Cemetery of Forgotten Books. The third installment, The Prisoner of Heaven was refreshing. The first two went from dark to darker so it was nice to have a slightly lighter story. Albeit not entirely a light and fluffy book. It has made me want to go back and re-read the first two as this book fills in a lot more history absent from the first ones. It feels like there’s a lot of discrepancy, but it may be that I’m not remembering everything correctly.

As for what’s next, I’m not so sure. I’ve been listening to a lot of TED Radio Hour episodes on NPR and have tucked away a few book recommendations. I’ll have to wait and see what our library has. I dare say we’ve had a pretty calm month. The school year has started again for Ryan, so I’m in the deep end of solo parenting 4 under 4. We’re trying to get back into the groove of a routine, or at least eating every day. Each day is a little bit different, just enough to keep me on my toes. If you don’t see me around here much, know it’s because I’m trying to survive and may not have time to document it.

2014-08-07 11.54.08
3 of the 4

Cormoran Strike Draws Ever Closer

Of course July is greatly anticipated in our house as we prepare for Genevieve. But does it make me a bad parent to admit, I may be more excited about June when Cormoran Strike comes back? Maybe that just makes me a mother of 4. Let’s not dwell on it.

Moving on, I just double checked Barnes and Noble’s website and they have an official availability date for the new Cormoran Strike novel, The Silkworm! The last time I checked, it was unclear if the US release date would be within three months of the UK release. Now it seems all is well and the book will be released here JUNE 19!!!

Here is the B&N link, you can pre-order for $21. And on that note, if anyone wants to gift me $21, that’d be cool.  As I may be waiting until our local library gets a copy, please don’t ruin the book for me come June 20th. Please and thank you!

Cormoran Strike Sequel Due This Summer!

I don’t know if this is *new* news, but I couldn’t sleep last night and checked Robert Galbraith’s website (Robert-Galbraith.com) and what to my weary eyes should appear, but a very exciting announcement!

The sequel to The Cuckoo’s Calling is due to be released June 19th this year, titled The Silkworm!! From the website:

When novelist Owen Quine goes missing, his wife calls in private detective Cormoran Strike. At first, she just thinks he has gone off by himself for a few days – as he has done before – and she wants Strike to find him and bring him home.

But as Strike investigates, it becomes clear that there is more to Quine’s disappearance than his wife realises. The novelist has just completed a manuscript featuring poisonous pen-portraits of almost everyone he knows. If the novel were published it would ruin lives – so there are a lot of people who might want to silence him.

And when Quine is found brutally murdered in bizarre circumstances, it becomes a race against time to understand the motivation of a ruthless killer, a killer unlike any he has encountered before…

I’ve mentioned my utter enjoyment with The Cuckoo’s Calling before. I was just excited to hear another book was in the works. Now knowing J. K. Rowling is writing a Cormoran Strike novel about a novelist just makes me giddy! I didn’t see any info on the website about UK vs USA release dates, but Barnes and Nobel have the book up for pre-order. The website says the hardback book will be available November 1 and June 24th for NOOK. Not really sure if that discrepancy is for real or what, but I know I’d like to get my hands on a copy as soon as possible!

More Cormoran Strike is on the Way!

I enjoyed reading The Cuckoo’s Calling vicariously  through a friend and sharing in her delight as she came to know Cormoran Strike. Over a facebook conversation, a third friend mentioned that J.K. Rowling has already finished the sequel and hopes to have it published this year again under the name Robert Galbraith (info per Robert Galbraith’s website: http://www.robert-galbraith.com)

Detective Cormoran Strike by O. Pelaez

How exciting is that?!?! I cannot wait for the release of a second Cormoran Strike book and sincerely hope more are still yet to come. So tell me, do you want Cormoran and Robin to end up together? Get your bets in now! And let me know if you hear any updates before I do!